Monday numbers

Monday numbers

- in Fitzsimon File

4,000—number of patients who die each year in North Carolina hospitals because of preventable hospital errors (“Temporal Trends in Rates of Patient Harm Resulting from Medical Care, New England Journal of Medicine,” New England Journal of Medicine, November 25, 2010)

5,700—number of patients permanently injured each year in North Carolina hospitals because of preventable hospital errors (Ibid)

1—number of chances out of five that patients admitted to a hospital in North Carolina will be harmed by the medical care they receive (Ibid)

13.8—percentage of medical induced harms in North Carolina hospitals that cause a permanent life threatening injury or death (Ibid)

22.5—percentage decrease in the number of annual medical malpractice cases filed from 2007-2009 compared to the average in the preceding nine years (Med Mal Report 2010).

1—number of times that Senator Bob Rucho claims in a Charlotte Observer column that physicians are “fleeing” North Carolina because of current medical malpractice laws (“ Is malpractice reform good for patients?, Charlotte Observer, Tuesday 22, 2011)

18—percentage increase in North Carolina’s population from 1998-2008 (Ibid)

29—percentage increase in the number of physicians in North Carolina between 1998-2008 (Ibid)

7—number of times that Rucho refers to Texas his column, claiming that changes in malpractice law there including caps on noneconomic damages enacted in 2003, have reduced medical costs and increased the numbers of physicians in the state. (“Is malpractice reform good for patients?, Charlotte Observer, Tuesday 22, 2011)

31.9—percentage increase in Medicare spending per enrollee in Texas from 2003 to 2007 (Kaiser Family Foundation, 2003, 2004, Dartmouth Atlas of Care, 2006, 2007)

25.8— percentage increase in Medicare spending per enrollee in North Carolina from 2003 to 2007 (Ibid)

9,962—amount in dollars of Medicare spending per enrollee in Texas in 2007 (Ibid)

7,911—amount in dollars of Medicare spending per enrollee in North Carolina in 2007 (Ibid)

23—percent that Medicare cost per enrollee in Texas increased faster than Medicare cost per enrollee in North Carolina in the five years after Texas enacted a $250,000 cap in malpractice cases. (Ibid)

2.6—number of physicians in Texas per 1,000 people (American Medical Association, Physician Characteristics and Distribution in the US, data from 2003-2008).

3.1—number of physicians in North Carolina per 1,000 people (Ibid)

2.6—percent that the number of physicians per capita in North Carolina increased faster than the number of physicians per capita in Texas since Texas enacted caps in medical malpractice cases. (Ibid)