- NC Policy Watch - http://www.ncpolicywatch.com -

Monday numbers

[1]

200—number of full-time jobs that House budget document claims to add in education next year (“NC House budget meets ‘less is more’ priorities,” Associated Press, May 1, 2011)

12,000—estimated number of education jobs that are actually cut in House budget (Ibid)

30—number of years since a state budget slashed as much spending from the previous year as the House budget proposes to cut next year’s budget (House Budget Recommendations, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, April 26, 2011)

7—percentage increase in the population of children under age 5 in North Carolina from 2007-2011 (Ibid)

34—percentage that House budget would cut spending on early childhood programs from pre-recession levels (Ibid)

23—percentage increase in North Carolina’s Medicaid eligible population 2007-2011 (Ibid)

2—percentage increase in House budget in Medicaid spending over pre-recession levels (Ibid)

7—increase in North Carolina’s total population from 2007-2001 (Ibid)

18—percentage that House budget would slash spending on public health over pre-recession levels (Ibid)

500 million—amount in dollars that the House budget reduces spending on public education by eliminating 8,694 teaching assistants, cutting 290 instructional support jobs, cut 1,700 non-instructional jobs, cutting support for limited English proficiency, eliminating Drop-Out Prevention Grants, cutting state support for textbooks by 68% and instructional supplies by 42%, and cutting funds for local school transportation (The Devil’s in the Details: House Budget Subcommittee Recommendations, N.C. Budget and Tax Center, April 13, 2011)

500 million—amount in dollars of increased state revenue if General Assembly would apply state sales tax to all consumer services and REDUCE state sales tax rate from 4.75% to 3.75% (Ibid)

37.6 million—amount in dollars of cut in funding for Smart Start in House budget (Ibid)

37 million—amount in dollars of increased state revenue if General Assembly eliminated tax subsidy for film and television productions in the state and ended other business subsidies proposed for elimination in 2009 Senate revenue plan (Ibid)

16 million—amount in dollars of cut in funding for More at Four in House budget (Ibid)

17 million— amount in dollars of increased state revenue if General Assembly repealed “Bill Lee” business tax subsidies, which a recent UNC study found to be ineffective at creating jobs in North Carolina (Ibid)

102 million—amount in dollars of cuts to community college system that include increasing tuition by $10 per credit hour, imposing management flexibility cut, reducing funding for basic skills by 13%, shifting GED to receipt-support by charging people to take test, and cutting minority male mentoring program by 10% (Ibid)

100 million—amount in dollars of increased state revenue if General Assembly would pass legislation to stop allowing multi-state corporations to shelter profits from the state corporate income tax (Ibid)