Monday numbers

Monday numbers

22—percentage of federal funding for education, clean water, law enforcement, and other state and local services that North Carolina would lose in 2014 in the budget proposed by Rep. Paul Ryan and recently passed by the U.S. House of Representatives (“Reducing Federal Deficits Without a Significant Revenue Increase Would Cost NC Billions,” N.C. Budget & Tax Center, August 6, 2012)

635 million—amount in dollars that North Carolina would lose in federal funding for education, clean water, law enforcement, and other state and local services in 2014 in the Ryan budget plan (Deficit-Reduction Package that lacks significant revenues would shift very substantial costs to states and localities, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, August 8, 2012)

5.568 billion—total amount in dollars that North Carolina would lose in federal funding for education, clean water, law enforcement, and other state and local services from 2013-2021 in the Ryan budget plan (Ibid)

1.675 million—number of people in North Carolina at risk of losing food stamp benefits under the Ryan budget plan (“Ryan Budget Would Slash SNAP Funding by $134 Billion Over Ten Years, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, April 18, 2012)

75—percentage of people who receive food-stamp benefits who live in families with children (Ibid)

93—percentage of food stamp benefits received by families who live below the federal poverty line (Ibid)

3—number of times that the cuts to non-discretionary funding in the Ryan budget plan would be greater than the cuts that are scheduled to automatically take effect in January 2014 as part of the sequestration process if Congress and the President do not come to an agreement on deficit reduction (Ibid)

9—number of years under Ryan budget until federal grant programs for states, counties, and cities would be less than half the average of the last 35 years. (Ibid)

34—percentage cut in federal Medicaid funding for states by 2022 under Ryan budget plan, in addition to reductions in funding that would result from the Ryan proposal’s call to repeal the Affordable Care Act (Ibid)

265,000—amount in dollars of the annual tax cut people with incomes above $1 million would receive under Rep. Ryan’s plan, on top of the $129,000 they would receive from extending the Bush tax cuts. (“Thinking About Tax Policy, Part 4: Ryan Plan a Costly Step in the Wrong Direction,” Off the Charts Blog, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, April 13, 2012)

45—percent of the tax cut in the Ryan budget plan that would go to the top one percent of taxpayers—people with incomes above $630,000 (Ibid)

12.5—average percentage increase in after-tax incomes of people with income of more than $1 million under the tax changes in the Ryan budget plan (Ibid)

1.8—average percentage increase in after-tax incomes of middle income households under the tax changes in the Ryan budget plan (Ibid)

0.2—average percentage DECREASE in after-tax incomes of people with annual income is between $20,000 and $30,000 in the Ryan budget plan (“Ryan Budget Would Raise Some Taxes; Guess Who Gets Hit?” Off the Charts Blog, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, April 12, 2012)