Fitzsimon File

Monday numbers

(The items in this week’s edition come from the N.C. Office of Charter Schools, the N.C. School Boards Association, and Matt Ellinwood of the Education and Law Project of the N.C. Justice Center)

100—number of charter schools currently in operation in North Carolina

9—number of additional charter schools approved for operation in 2012-2013 in fast track application process last spring after the General Assembly lifted the cap of 100 on charter schools in 2011

25—number of additional charter schools recommended to the State Board of Education for operation in 2013-2014 by the North Carolina Public Charter Schools Advisory Council

34—percentage of potential increase in the number of charter schools in operation in North Carolina by 2013-2014

6—number of total staff members in the Office of Charter Schools in the Department of Public Instruction that is charged with the oversight of all charter schools

2—number of full-time employees in the Office of Charter Schools in the Department of Public Instruction that is charged with the oversight of all charter schools

17—number of the 25 additional charter schools recommended to the State Board of Education for operation in 2013-2014 that have no facility identified for school operations

16—number of 25 additional charter schools recommended to the State Board of Education for operation in 2013-2014 that have no plan to provide transportation to students

7—number of 25 additional charter schools recommended to the State Board of Education for operation in 2013-2014 that plan to outsource operations and/or financial management

5—number of those companies that will provide operations and/or financial management that are not located in North Carolina

30—percentage of current charter school students who qualify as economically disadvantaged under No Child Left Behind

55—percentage of students in traditional public schools who qualify as economically disadvantaged under No Child Left Behind

33—number of the state’s 99 charter schools in operation in 2010-2011 that had less than 15 percent of their students who qualify as economically disadvantaged under No Child Left Behind

100—percentage of teachers at a traditional public school that must be licensed to teach in North Carolina

50—allowable percentage of teachers in middle and high school charters that may be unlicensed to teach in North Carolina

25—allowable percentage of teachers in charter elementary schools that may be unlicensed to teach in North Carolina

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