Fitzsimon File

Monday numbers

2.8 billion—amount in dollars that North Carolina owes the federal government in unemployment compensation funds (“Business must cover the unemployment insurance debt,” Winston-Salem Journal, September 16, 2012)

26—number of states, including North Carolina, forced to borrow money from the federal government to pay unemployment insurance claims during the Great Recession  (GETTING SOLVENT: Rebuilding the Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund to Protect North Carolina’s Economy, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, May 2012)

10.5—number of months in length, on average, of previous 10 recessions from 1946-2006 (Ibid)

18—length in months of the Great Recession that technically ended in June 2009 (Ibid)

6—number of times that unemployment insurance taxes on businesses were reduced in North Carolina from 1992-2000 (Ibid)

2.8 billion—amount in dollars that would have been in North Carolina’s unemployment insurance trust fund in 2004 if the state had required contributions from employers at the national average tax rate from 1990-2004 (Ibid)

0—amount North Carolina would currently owe the federal government for unemployment insurance funding if the state had required contributions from employers at the national average tax rate from 1990-2004 (Ibid)

23 million—amount in dollars of the balance in the state’s unemployment insurance trust fund in 2004, three years before the beginning of the Great Recession (Ibid)

2—amount in dollars of economic activity generated for every one dollar paid out in unemployment insurance (Ibid)

1,144—amount in dollars of average monthly unemployment insurance benefit in North Carolina (BTC BRIEF: The Time is Now: Extending Unemployment Benefits, May 2010)

50—percent of average families’ basic necessities covered by average monthly unemployment insurance benefit (Ibid)

32—percent of a living income standard for a family of three covered by average monthly unemployment insurance benefit (Ibid)

6—rank of North Carolina among the 50 states in the number of jobs lost since the start of the Great Recession (“State of Working North Carolina 2012,” by the N.C. Budget and Tax Center)

17.5—percentage of North Carolinians living in poverty in 2010 (Ibid)

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