Fitzsimon File

Monday numbers

8—percentage of overall pay raise given by Governor Pat McCrory to members of his newly appointed cabinet (“Gov. Pat McCrory gives his cabinet generous salary hikes,” Raleigh News & Observer, January 10, 2013)

11—percentage of pay raise McCrory approved for four of his cabinet secretaries (Ibid)

13,200—amount in dollars of annual salary increase McCrory approved for four of his cabinet secretaries (Ibid)

4—number of days since McCrory said he increased the salary of his cabinet appointees that he was just “trying to make it where they can at least afford to live…” (Ibid)

135,000—amount in dollars of annual salary of four highest-paid cabinet members of McCrory Administration after the salary increase (Ibid)

294—amount in dollars of average weekly unemployment benefit in North Carolina, which is right at the national average (“No easy solutions for state’s $2.4 billion debt,” Raleigh News & Observer, November 23, 2012)

33—percentage cut in maximum weekly unemployment benefits for laid off workers in the Republican/N.C. Chamber proposal to repay $2.4 billion unemployment debt to the federal government and restructure state unemployment compensation system (Presentation by George Wentworth with the National Employment Labor Project at Crucial Conversation Luncheon in Raleigh January 7, 2013)

0—number of states that have ever made a cut to the maximum weekly benefit as large as the one proposed in the Republican/N.C. Chamber proposal (Ibid)

6—-reduction in maximum number of weeks that unemployed workers could receive benefits under Republican/N.C. Chamber unemployment proposal (Ibid)

10—minimum percentage reduction in average weekly benefit under Republican/N.C. Chamber unemployment proposal (Ibid)

6—number of days since Governor Pay McCrory expressed support for the Republican proposal to slash unemployment benefits and said it would be one of the first pieces of legislation that he would sign as governor (“Plan to overhaul state’s unemployment system moves forward,” Smithfield Herald, January 8, 2013)

264—amount in dollars of likely average weekly unemployment benefit in North Carolina if the Republican/N.C. Chamber proposal is enacted (Presentation by George Wentworth with the National Employment Labor Project at Crucial Conversation Luncheon in Raleigh January 7, 2013)

5,280—total amount in dollars unemployed workers would receive at the lower average weekly benefit rate under the Republican/N.C. Chamber proposal endorsed by McCrory over the new maximum of 20 weeks, reduced from the current 26 week maximum

13,200—amount in dollars of annual salary increase McCrory approved for four of his cabinet secretaries so they “could afford to live” (“Gov. Pat McCrory gives his cabinet generous salary hikes,” Raleigh News & Observer, January 10, 2013)

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