Fitzsimon File

Monday numbers

11.2—percentage increase in income for the top 1 percent of earners during the recovery from the Great Recession (“Incomes Flat in Recovery, but Not for the 1%,” New York Time, February 16, 2013)

0.4—percentage decline in income for the bottom 99 percent of earners during the recovery from the Great Recession (Ibid)

42—percentage of American men born into the bottom fifth of income earners who stay there as adults (“Harder for Americans to Rise From Lower Rungs, The New York Times, January 4, 2013)

62—percentage of Americans raised in the top fifth of incomes who stay in the top two-fifths (Ibid)

65—percentage of Americans born into the bottom fifth on incomes who stay in the bottom two-fifths (Ibid)

7.9—ratio of average household income for richest 20 percent of households in North Carolina to poorest 20 percent from 2008-2010 (“Income Inequality Has Grown in North Carolina, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, November 15, 2012)

250,000—amount in dollars of average income of richest five percent of North Carolina households (Ibid)

19,000—amount in dollars of average income of poorest 20 percent of North Carolina households (Ibid)

3.7—percentage drop in income among the poorest 20 percent of households in North Carolina from the mid 1990s to the mid 2000s (Ibid)

8.8—percentage increase in income among the richest 5 percent of households in North Carolina from the mid 1990s to the mid 2000s (Ibid)

12.3—percentage increase in income among the poorest 20 percent of households in North Carolina from the mid 1970s to the mid 2000s (Ibid)

105.3— percentage increase in income among the richest 5 percent of households in North Carolina from the mid 1970s to the mid 2000s (Ibid)

17—rank of North Carolina among 50 states in greatest income inequality (Ibid)

90—percentage of Americans who believe that the government should do everything it can to ensure equality of opportunity (Stiglitz, Joseph, “Equal Opportunity, Our National Myth,” The New York Times, February 16, 2013)

500—amount in dollars of the annual increase in taxes that a family earning $24,000 dollars a year would pay under the tax reform proposal from Senate Republican leaders and the Civitas Institute written by economist Arthur Laffer (“BTC REPORTS: A “Laffable” Plan for Tax Reform – The Civitas/Laffer/Senate Plan for North Carolina Shifts Load to the Poor, Middle-class,” January 2013)

8,172—amount in dollars of the annual reduction in taxes that a family earning $228,000 would receive under the Civitas/Laffer/Senate tax reform proposal (Ibid)

41,000—amount in dollars of the annual reduction in taxes that a family earning $1 million dollars would receive under the Civitas/Laffer/Senate tax reform proposal (Ibid)