Monday numbers

Monday numbers

- in Fitzsimon File

number415

90 million—amount in dollars that school voucher proposal by Rep. Paul Stam would divert in funding from public schools over the next two years (“Stam to unveil Expansive School Voucher Plan,” Carolina Journal,  April 10, 2013)

3,990—amount in dollars of the average voucher provided to students in proposal from Rep. Paul Stam according to fiscal research staff of General Assembly (Ibid)

19,105—amount in dollars of annual tuition for students in grades 1-4 at Charlotte Country Day School (charlottecountryday.org)

65—percentage of public school students in North Carolina who would be eligible for voucher in the second year of proposal from Rep. Paul Stam (Ibid)

9,635—number of vouchers that would be provided in the 2013-2014 school year under proposal from Rep. Paul Stam (Ibid)

62—percent of vouchers provided in 2013-2014 under proposal by House Speaker Paul Stam that would go to students currently enrolled in private or religious schools (Ibid)

70,650—amount in dollars that a family of four could earn and still receive a voucher under proposal from Rep. Paul Stam (Ibid)

23,550—amount in dollars of the annual income eligibility limit for NC Pre-K for a family of four under legislation filed by House Appropriations Chair Justin Burr ( N.C. General Assembly, House Bill 395)

0—impact of voucher program in Washington D.C. on students’ academic performance according to two studies in 2007 and 2008 from the U.S Department of Department of Education under President George W. Bush (School Vouchers, Campaign for America’s Future, and Vouchers and Public School Performance: A Case Study of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program, October 2, 2007)

8—length, in years, of study of Milwaukee’s school voucher program that found that vouchers did not raise overall academic performance and failed to raise public school achievement through competition, as many conservatives had claimed they would. (Ibid)

14—months since House Majority Leader Paul Stam told an audience never to use the term school vouchers because “vouchers don’t poll very well” (The fight for the survival of public schools, N.C. Policy Watch, February 1, 2011)

56—percentage of registered voters in North Carolina who do not support using school vouchers to help parents pay for their children to attend private or religious schools instead of public schools. (Carolina Issues Poll, N.C. Policy Watch, March 2011)

39—percent of registered voters in North Carolina who support using school vouchers to help parents pay for their children to attend private or religious schools instead of public schools. (Ibid)