Fitzsimon File

Monday numbers

minimum-wage3

60—number of days since bill to index the state minimum wage to inflation was introduced in the state Senate by Sen. Earline Parmon, Sen. Don Davis and Sen. Angela Bryant and referred to Senate Rules Committee (N.C. General Assembly, Senate Bill 220)

0—number of hearings held on Senate Bill 220 to index the state minimum wage to inflation (Ibid)

10—number of days until crossover deadline when any bill that has not passed either the House or Senate will be dead for the current two-year legislative session (N.C. General Assembly)

7.25—amount in dollars of the current federal minimum wage (“Time for a Raise: The impact of raising the minimum wage on North Carolina’s working families and the economy,” NC Justice Center’s Workers’ Rights Project Brief, March 2013)

10.59—amount in dollars of the level of the current federal minimum wage if it had been indexed to inflation since 2009 when it was increased to $7.25 (“Next Wave of State Minimum Wage Proposals Would ‘Index’ To Inflation, Stateline March 15, 2013)

15,080—amount in dollars earned by a minimum-wage worker in a year (“Time for a Raise: The impact of raising the minimum wage on North Carolina’s working families and the economy,” NC Justice Center’s Workers’ Rights Project Brief, March 2013)

19,530—amount in dollars of the federal poverty level in 2013 for a family of three (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)

10—number of states that currently index their state minimum wage to inflation (“Next Wave of State Minimum Wage Proposals Would ‘Index’ To Inflation, Stateline March 15, 2013)

6—number of months until voters in New Jersey will decide if state minimum wage will be indexed to inflation and raised to $8.25 (Ibid)

10—number of additional states currently considering indexing their minimum wage to inflation (Ibid)

19—number of states with state minimum wage higher than the federal minimum wage (Ibid)

10—number of times since 1998 that proposed increases in the minimum wage have been on statewide ballots across the country (Ibid)

10—number of times since 1998 that proposed increases in the minimum wage have passed in statewide votes (Ibid)

65—average percent of the vote won by proposed increases in the minimum wage in statewide ballot measures since 1998 (Ibid)

9.00—amount in dollars of the federal minimum wage in 2015 under proposal by President Obama (“Time for a Raise: The impact of raising the minimum wage on North Carolina’s working families and the economy,” NC Justice Center’s Workers’ Rights Project Brief, March 2013)

527,000—number of workers in North Carolina who earn less than $9.00 an hour who would be affected by a raise in the minimum wage (Ibid)

166,000—number of workers in North Carolina who earn slightly above $9.00 an hour who would indirectly benefit from increase in minimum wage as employers incrementally increase their wages to reflect the new wage floor (Ibid)

61—percentage of workers in North Carolina who would benefit from an increase in the federal minimum wage to $9.00 who are women (Ibid)

49.9—percentage of workers in North Carolina who would benefit from an increase in the federal minimum wage to $9.00 who are white (Ibid)

31.2— percentage of workers in North Carolina who would benefit from an increase in the federal minimum wage to $9.00 who are African-American (Ibid)

13.9— percentage of workers in North Carolina who would benefit from an increase in the federal minimum wage to $9.00 who are Hispanic (Ibid)

81.6—percentage of workers in North Carolina who would benefit from an increase in the federal minimum wage to $9.00 who are age 20 and above (Ibid)

781.5 million—amount in dollars of directly and indirectly increased wages in North Carolina from raising the federal minimum wage to $9.00 an hour (Ibid)

494.7 million—amount in dollars of the impact on the state GDP of raising the federal minimum wage to $9.00 an hour (Ibid)

4,300—number of estimated additional jobs created in North Carolina by raising the federal minimum wage to $9.00 an hour (Ibid)

71—percentage of Americans who support President Obama’s proposal to increase the federal minimum wage to $9.00 an hour (Survey conducted by Pew Research Center and USA Today, February 13-18, 2013)

26—percentage of Americans who oppose President Obama’s proposal to increase the federal minimum wage to $9.00 an hour (Ibid)