Fitzsimon File

Monday numbers

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70,000—number of long term unemployed workers in North Carolina who lost federal emergency unemployment benefits as of Sunday June 30 because of the effective date of the changes the General Assembly made to state unemployment system (The Unemployment Insurance Cliff:  A Steep Fall for Families, the Economy, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, June 2013)

100,000—number of additional long term unemployed workers who will lose federal emergency unemployment benefits before the end of the year because of the actions of the General Assembly (Ibid)

100—percentage of the cost of the emergency unemployment benefits that would have been paid by the federal government (“Media Release: AFL-CIO, NC Justice Center ask lawmakers to take action, keep families from going over unemployment cliff, N.C. Justice Center, June 3, 2013)

0—amount in dollars of the cost to the state of extending emergency unemployment benefits to 70,000 long-term unemployed workers (Ibid)

0—number of other states that have lost emergency federal unemployment benefits as a result of actions or inaction of their state lawmakers (Ibid)

5—rank of NC among the 50 states with the highest unemployment rates (Ibid)

600 million—amount in dollars in total federal emergency unemployment benefits that will be lost to North Carolina as a result of the actions of the General Assembly (The Unemployment Insurance Cliff:  A Steep Fall for Families, the Economy, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, June 2013)

1.2 billion—amount in dollars of the estimated economic impact in North Carolina of the loss of federal emergency unemployment benefits as a result of the actions of the General Assembly (Ibid)

26—maximum number of weeks laid off workers in North Carolina could receive state unemployment before the General Assembly changed it earlier this year (Overhauling the State’s Unemployment Insurance System: New Proposal Takes NC from the Middle of the Pack all the Way to the Back, N.C. Justice Center, January 2013)

43—number of states that pay a maximum of 26 weeks of unemployment benefits (Ibid)

20—maximum number of weeks laid off workers in North Carolina can receive unemployment benefits under sliding scale in the law passed by the General Assembly earlier this year (Ibid)

12—maximum number of weeks some laid off workers in North Carolina could receive unemployment benefits under sliding scale in the law passed by the General Assembly earlier this year (Ibid)

1—number of other states that currently have a sliding scale for maximum length of benefits that begins as a low as 12 weeks (Ibid)

0—number of unemployed workers as of July 1 who are eligible for benefits if they lost a job because they were unable to accept work during a particular shift because of the inability to secure child care, eldercare, or care for a disabled family member—the General Assembly eliminated this hardship provision (Countdown to the Unemployment Cliff: What about those eligibility changes and “suitable work” requirements?, The Progressive Pulse,  June 23, 2013)

0—number of workers as of July 1 who are eligible for benefits if they left their jobs solely because they or their minor child, aged or disabled parent or other immediate family member have a disability or health condition that justified leaving— the General Assembly also eliminated this hardship provision (Ibid)