Fitzsimon File

Monday numbers

Numbers_type400

228,000—amount in dollars the state has paid HHS adviser Joe Hauck in 2013 for a special services contract (“Adviser to NC DHHS secretary made $228,000 in eight months,” Raleigh News & Observer, September 5, 2013)

310,000—amount in dollars of the cap on compensation in Hauck’s contract, which runs through November 30 (Ibid)

11,750—amount in dollars that Hauck and his wife contributed to the 2012 campaign of Governor Pat McCrory (“State health agency gave big contract to Wos acquaintance,” WRAL-TV, September 6, 2013)

8—number of months Hauck since began his personal services contract with HHS after taking a leaving from New Breed Logistics, a High Point Company at which the CEO is Louis DeJoy, husband of HHS Secretary Aldona Wos (Ibid)

216,000—amount in dollars employees of New Breed Logistics and their families contributed to 2012 campaign of Governor Pat McCrory (Ibid)

25,000—amount in dollars that New Breed Logistics gave to the Republican Governors Association which supported McCrory’s 2012 campaign (Ibid)

105,000—amount in dollars that the state has paid Charlotte management consultant Carol Ransone for a special services contract since February (“Other DHHS contractor made $ 100,000 in six months,” The Progressive Pulse, September 6)

100—amount in dollars that HHS rules set as a maximum for hourly rate for personal services for doctors (Ibid)

75—amount in dollars that HHS rules set as a maximum for hourly rate for personal services for attorneys (Ibid)

50—amount in dollars that HHS rules set as a maximum for hourly rate for personal services for consultants (Ibid)

90—amount in dollars per hour that HHS has paid Charlotte management consultant Carol Ransone under a special services contract since February (Ibid)

125—amount in dollars per hour that HHS has paid adviser Joe Hauck in 2013 for a special services since February (Ibid)

62—number of days after Governor Pat McCrory took the oath of office in January that he issued a memo directing state agencies to hold salary increases, limit purchases and reduce travel to cover the state’s Medicaid liabilities.” (Press Release, Office of Governor Pat McCrory, March 8, 2013)

24—number of days after the release of the memo freezing salaries that two 24-year-old former employees of McCrory’s campaign now working at HHS received raises of $23,000 and $22,500 respectively (“Big pay hikes in DHHS leadership team,” The Progressive Pulse, April 14, 2013)

30,800—amount in dollars of starting salary of teacher in North Carolina public schools (Ibid)

15—number of years a teacher must work in North Carolina public schools to earn $40,000 a year (Ibid)

0—amount in dollars of the raise for teachers in the budget passed by the General Assembly and signed by   Governor McCrory (Ibid)

10—percentage pay boost for teachers who earn master’s degrees that was eliminated this year by the budget passed by the General Assembly and signed by Governor McCrory (“N.C. teacher pay stranded by shifts in education laws,” Charlotte Observer, August 17, 2013)

280—total number of employees at HHS who received raises after the March 8 memo from Governor McCrory directing agencies to hold the line on salary increases (“Hefty raises at DHHS raise question of qualifications,” WRAL-TV,  August 16, 2013)

166,000—amount in dollars the Renew North Carolina Foundation, a political group with close ties to McCrory, recently spent buying television time for 60-second ads beginning Monday, September 9 (“McCrory affinity group going on the air,” WRAL-TV, September 6, 2013)