Fitzsimon File

Monday numbers

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6 million—number of people who had signed up for health care nationwide under the Affordable Care Act as of March 27 (“Obamacare Enrollment May Hit Initial 7 Million Goal at Deadline,” Bloomberg News, March 31, 2014)

15—number of hours as of 9:00 a.m. March 31 until the initial enrollment period for the Affordable Care ends for most eligible applicants—those who have already begun the application process before midnight may continue to enroll(“Interest in health care surges as enrollment deadline nears,” USA Today March 30, 2014)

2 million—number of visits over the weekend to the federal enrollment website, healthcare.gov (Ibid)

8.7 million—number of visits to the federal enrollment website healthcare.gov from Sunday March 23 to Sunday March 30 (“Obamacare Enrollment Could Hit 7 Million As Signup Enters Final Day, Forbes.com, March 30, 2014)

0.5—-average percentage error rate of the healthcare.gov website (Ibid)

400—average length of wait time, in milliseconds, at the healthcare.gov website (Ibid)

2.5 million—number of calls handled in the last week by the federal call center for enrollment under the ACA—more calls than received in the entire month of February (“Interest in health care surges as enrollment deadline nears,” USA Today March 30, 2014)

70—percentage of enrollees in New York under the Affordable Act who were previously uninsured (Ibid)

200,000—estimated number of people in North Carolina who had signed up for coverage under the Affordable Care Act as of March 1 (“North Carolina insurance enrollments among top in nation,” Charlotte Observer, March 30, 2014)

191,000—number of enrollees in North Carolina originally set as the goal for enrollment under the Affordable Care Act (Ibid)

5—rank of North Carolina among the 50 states in the number of people who applied for coverage under the Affordable Care Act as of March 1 (Ibid)

8.3 million—amount in dollars of spending on ads attacking the Affordable Care Act in North Carolina by Americans for Prosperity as part of their efforts to defeat Senator Kay Hagan (“Morning Memo: Another day, another big TV ad blitz in Senate race, March 26, 2014)

74 million—amount in dollars of a federal grant for North Carolina to help people enroll for health care under the Affordable Care  rejected by Governor Pat McCrory and the General Assembly (Affordable Care Act: Working in Washington, NC but Medicaid Expansion Critical, Progressive Pulse, March 28, 2014)

500,000—estimated number of uninsured adults who would have been covered by Medicaid expansion rejected by Governor Pat McCrory and the General Assembly (“NC Medicaid Expansion: Interstate 540 and the hypocrisy of the “federal money might not be there” argument, Progressive Pulse,  February 17, 2014)

100—percentage of the cost of Medicaid expansion that would have been paid by the federal government three years (Ibid)

90—percentage of the cost of Medicaid expansion that would have been paid by the federal government after three years (Ibid)

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