Monday numbers

Monday numbers

- in Fitzsimon File

FF-leg_numbers

445 million—amount in dollars of the state revenue shortfall in the 2013-2014 fiscal year (“Raising the Bar in the Budget Debate: North Carolina should rebuild for the future, not cut back,” N.C. Budget & Tax Center, 2014)

140 million—amount in dollars of the projected Medicaid shortfall for the 2013-2014 fiscal year (Ibid)

335 million—amount in dollars of the state budget gap for the 2013-2014 fiscal year even after using money left unspent in 2013-2014 budget (Ibid)

191 million—amount in dollars of the projected state budget shortfall in 2014-2015 in the consensus revenue estimate between the Office of State Budget and Management and the Fiscal Research Division of the N.C. General Assembly (Ibid)

600 million—amount in dollars of the potential state revenue shortfall in 2014-2015 because of the higher than expected cost of the personal income tax cuts enacted in 2013 (Ibid)

192 million— amount in dollars of the projected Medicaid shortfall for the 2014-2015 fiscal year (Ibid)

228 million—amount in dollars of the total projected state budget gap in 2014-2015 in the consensus revenue estimate between the Office of State Budget and Management and the Fiscal Research Division of the N.C. General Assembly (Ibid)

637 million—amount in dollars of the potential state budget gap in 2014-2015 in the consensus revenue estimate between the Office of State Budget and Management and the Fiscal Research Division of the N.C. General Assembly (Ibid)

314 million—amount in dollars of the potential cost of the proposal by Governor Pat McCrory to give all teachers at least two percent salary increase and state employees a flat increase of $1000 (“Where is the money? The tax plan makes education plans impossible,” The Progressive Pulse, May 7, 2014)

334 million—amount in dollars of the potential cost of Governor McCrory’s pay proposal if university personnel are included in the across the board increase (Ibid)

971 million—amount in dollars of the total of the potential 2014-2015 budget gap and the cost of Governor McCrory’s salary proposal—the amount that lawmakers would have to cut from existing programs or raise with additional revenue to balance the state budget (Ibid)