Monday numbers

Monday numbers

- in Fitzsimon File

Monday numbers holidays(This final 2014 edition of Monday numbers includes at least one number from each month of Monday numbers in the past year.)

15—number of days since three state historic tax credits will expire as part of tax changes made by the General Assembly in 2013 and signed into law by Governor Pat McCrory (“Historic tax credit sunset spurs jump in NC renovation proposals, News & Observer, November 29, 2014)

23,100—number of full-time jobs created by rehabilitation costs expended on historic tax credit projects in North Carolina since 1998 (North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office)

289,180—number of workers missing from the labor force who would otherwise be looking for work if job opportunities were stronger (“Missing Workers in North Carolina,” N.C. Budget & Tax Center)

12.5— the unemployment rate in North Carolina if workers missing from the labor force were included in the calculation (Ibid)

566,000—number of children living in poverty in North Carolina (Kids Count Data, Center Annie E. Casey Foundation)

38—rank of North Carolina among 50 states in lowest child poverty rate (Kids Count Data, Center Annie E. Casey Foundation)

18,309—estimated number of same-sex couples living in North Carolina according to the 2010 U.S. Census (“Estimating the Economic Boost of Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in North Carolina,” the Williams Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, October 2014)

9,155—estimated number of same-sex couples in North Carolina that will choose to marry in the next three years (Ibid)

64.4 million—amount in dollars of economic activity generated for the state’s economy by extending marriage equality to same-sex couples in North Carolina (Ibid)

14.5—percentage reduction in per pupil spending in North Carolina from 2007-2008 to 2014-2015 when adjusted for inflation (“Most States Still Funding Schools Less Than Before the Recession,” Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, October 16, 2014)

7—-rank of North Carolina among 50 states in largest percentage of reduction in per pupil spending from 2007-2008 to 2014-2015 (Ibid)

1—rank of North Carolina among the 50 states in the amount of the reduction in per pupil spending in 2014-2015 (Ibid)

513 million—amount in dollars of the original estimate of the cost of the 2013 tax plan in the 2014-2015 fiscal year (“2015 Budget Undermines North Carolina’s Competitiveness: It Is Unusstainable, Inadequate, and Hampered by the Costly 2013 Tax Plan, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, September 2014)

704 million—amount in dollars of the revised estimate of the cost of the 2013 tax plan in the 2014-2015 fiscal year (Ibid)

1.1 billion—amount in dollars of the latest estimate of cost of the 2013 tax plan in the 2014-2015 fiscal year by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (Ibid)

66—percentage of tax cut passed by the 2013 General Assembly that will go to the wealthiest one percent of North Carolinians (“Final tax plan pits at risk what makes North Carolina great,” N.C. Budget & Tax Center, August, 2013)

7.25—amount in dollars of the current federal minimum wage (U.S. Department of Labor)

10.90—amount in dollars the federal minimum wage would be if it had kept up with inflation over the past 40 years (Raise the Minimum Wage, a project of the National Employment Law Project)

1,065,000—number of workers in North Carolina who would benefit from an increase in the federal minimum wage to $10.10 an hour (“Raise the Wage, www.whitehouse.gov)

39.6 billion—amount in dollars that North Carolina is forfeiting in federal funding over the next 10 years by not expanding Medicaid (Ibid)

11.3 billion—amount in dollars that hospitals in North Carolina are losing in federal funding from 2013-2022 that was intended to offset their loss of funding for Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement (Ibid)

414,000—number of uninsured adults in North Carolina who would qualify for coverage if the state expanded Medicaid (“What Is the Result of States Not Expanding Medicaid?”, Urban Institute and Robert Wood Foundation, August, 2014)

33—number of unlined coal ash pits that Duke Energy has at 14 sites throughout North Carolina (Associated Press: “NC House approves Duke coal ash cleanup bill” – July 3, 2014)

100—percentage of these sites that are currently leaching contaminants into surrounding soil and groundwater (“Unlined and Dangerous: Duke Energy’s 32 Coal Ash Ponds in North Carolina Pose a Threat to Groundwater” National Geographic, March 5, 2014)

14—maximum number of weeks laid off workers in North Carolina can receive unemployment insurance as of July 1 (What’s the Harm? Plenty. Unemployment Insurance Changes Threaten the State’s Economy and Hurt the Unemployed,” N.C. Budget & Tax Center, July, 2014)

0—number of other states in the country that provide offer fewer weeks of unemployment insurance for laid off workers (Ibid)

357,584—number of people in North Carolina who signed up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act in the 2014 enrollment period (“Health Insurance Marketplace: Summary Enrollment Report for the Initial Annual Open Enrollment Period, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, May 1, 2014)

0—number of board members of the new Economic Development Partnership of North Carolina—who will play a role in determining which corporations receive incentives from the state—that have to file statements of economic interest under the State Ethics Act to avoid conflicts of interest (“New state economic development group outside of ethics laws,” N.C. Policy Watch, March 6, 2014)

5—number of the members of the five-member N.C. Board of Electrolysis Examiners who have to file statements of economic interest under the State Ethics Act to avoid conflicts of interest (Ibid)

2.9—percentage decline in the income of the bottom 99 percent of households in North Carolina from 2009-2011 (“Increasingly Unequal in North Carolina: A Growing Threat to a Strong Economic Foundation, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, February, 2014)

6.2—percentage growth in the income of the wealthiest one percent of North Carolina households from 2009-2011 (Ibid)

702,000—amount in dollars of the average income of the wealthiest one percent of North Carolina households (Ibid)