Monday numbers

Monday numbers

- in Fitzsimon File

numbers-1-05

9—number of days until the 2015 session of the General Assembly convenes (N.C. General Assembly)

190 million—amount in dollars that state revenues were below projections for the first five months of the fiscal year (“North Carolina state revenues are $190M short of forecast,” Associated Press, December 11, 2014)

513 million—amount in dollars of the original estimate of the cost of the 2013 tax plan in the 2014-2015 fiscal year (“2015 Budget Undermines North Carolina’s Competitiveness: It Is Unstainable, Inadequate, and Hampered by the Costly 2013 Tax Plan, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, September 2014)

704 million—amount in dollars of the revised estimate of the cost of the 2013 tax plan in the 2014-2015 fiscal year (Ibid)

1.1 billion—amount in dollars of the latest estimate of cost of the 2013 tax plan in the 2014-2015 fiscal year by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (Ibid)

66—percentage of tax cut passed by the 2013 General Assembly that will go to the wealthiest one percent of North Carolinians (“Final tax plan pits at risk what makes North Carolina great,” N.C. Budget & Tax Center, August, 2013)

940,000—amount in dollars of annual income of wealthiest one percent of North Carolinians (Ibid)

14.5—percentage reduction in per pupil spending in North Carolina from 2007-2008 to 2014-2015 when adjusted for inflation (“Most States Still Funding Schools Less Than Before the Recession,” Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, October 16, 2014)

6—-rank of North Carolina among 50 states in largest percentage of reduction in per pupil spending from 2007-2008 to 2014-2015 (Ibid)

250—amount in dollars of reduction of per pupil spending in North Carolina in 2014-2015 (Ibid)

1—rank of North Carolina among the 50 states in the amount of the reduction in per pupil spending in 2014-2015 (Ibid)

28—number of states including the District of Columbia that have already expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (“A 50-State Look at Medicaid Expansion,” Families USA)

4—number of additional states, all with Republican governors, where officials are in discussions with the federal government about expanding Medicaid (Ibid)

500,000—number of low-income adults denied health care coverage in North Carolina because the 2014-2015 budget does not expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (Ibid)

25,000—number of new jobs that would be created by expanding Medicaid in North Carolina (Medicaid Expansion Option Issue Brief, N.C. Institute of Medicine)

65.4 million—amount in net dollars the state would save over eight years by expanding Medicaid (Ibid)

11.3 billion—amount in dollars of the lost revenue to hospitals in North Carolina over the next ten years because of the decision not to expand Medicaid (“What Is the Result of States Not Expanding Medicaid?,”  Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Urban Institute, August 2014)

6.087 million—number of children living in poverty in the U.S. (Kids Count Data, Center Annie E. Casey Foundation)

22—percentage of children in the U.S. living in poverty (Ibid)

566,000—number of children living in poverty in North Carolina (Kids Count Data, Center Annie E. Casey Foundation)

25—percentage of children in North Carolina living in poverty (Ibid)

39—percentage of African-American children in North Carolina living in poverty (National Center for Children in Poverty)

23,850—amount in dollars of the federal poverty level for a family of 4 in 2014 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)