Monday numbers

Monday numbers

numbers_medicaid31—number of states, including the District of Columbia, that have expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (“Health Reform’s Medicaid Expansion, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities)

25—percentage of low-income non-elderly veterans who were uninsured in 2014 in non-Medicaid expansion states like North Carolina (“Veterans’ Health Coverage Lags in States That Haven’t Expanded Medicaid,” Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, November 10, 2015)

18—percentage of low-income non-elderly veterans who were uninsured in 2014 in states that had expanded Medicaid (Ibid)

120,000—number of low-income veterans who do not have access to health care coverage because they live in states like North Carolina that have not expanded Medicaid (Ibid)

3.6 million—number of currently uninsured Americans who would gain coverage if the remaining states (including North Carolina) expanded Medicaid to cover people caught in a “coverage gap,”—incomes too high for Medicaid but too low to qualify for federal subsidies to buy marketplace coverage. (“Supreme Court Ruling Means No Reason to Delay Medicaid Expansion, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, June 26, 2015)

19.3—percentage of uninsured rate in 2014 among non-senior adults in states that have not expanded Medicaid (Ibid)

13.3— percentage of uninsured rate in 2014 among non-senior adults in states that have expanded Medicaid (Ibid)

30.8 million—amount in dollars of savings in fiscal year 2014 from Medicaid expansion in Arkansas, a state with a Republican governor and Republican control of the General Assembly (“Medicaid Expansion Is Producing Large Gains in Health Coverage and Saving States Money,” Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, April 28, 2015)

88.8 million—amount in dollars of savings projected in fiscal year 2015 from Medicaid expansion in Arkansas (Ibid)

46.5—percentage drop in inpatient admission of uninsured patients in Arkansas hospitals in 12-month period after Medicaid expansion (Ibid)

35.5—percentage drop in emergency room visits by uninsured patients in Arkansas hospitals in 12-month period after Medicaid expansion (Ibid)

500,000—number of low-income people in North Carolina who would receive health care coverage if Medicaid was expanded (“Factsheet: Expanding Medicaid in North Carolina, N.C. Justice Center, March 2015)

2 billion—amount in dollars of federal funding that would flow to North Carolina every year if Medicaid was expanded (Ibid)

39.6 billion—amount in total dollars that North Carolina is forfeiting in federal funding over the next 10 years by not expanding Medicaid (“What Is the Result of States Not Expanding Medicaid?,” Urban Institute and Robert Wood Foundation, August 2014)

318 million—amount in dollars North Carolina would save between 2016 and 2020 if Medicaid was expanded (Ibid)

11.3 billion—amount in dollars that hospitals in North Carolina are losing in federal funding from 2013-2022 that was intended to offset their loss of funding for Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement (“What Is the Result of States Not Expanding Medicaid?” Urban Institute and Robert Wood Foundation, August 2014)

270—number of days since Governor Pat McCrory said he wouldn’t make a recommendation about Medicaid expansion in North Carolina until the Supreme Court ruled on the constitutionality of health care subsidies under the Affordable Care Act (“McCrory says he will wait on Medicaid expansion until Supreme Court ruling, News & Observer, February 19, 2015)

144—number of days since the Supreme Court upheld the availability of health care subsidies under the Affordable Care Act in states like North Carolina that have not set up their own health care exchanges (“U.S. Supreme Court upholds subsidies for eligible purchasers on all health care exchanges,” Progressive Pulse, Jun 25, 2015)

144—number of days since Gov. McCrory said “now that the Supreme Court has ruled on this matter, we must build a North Carolina-based reform plan” (Office of Gov. Pat McCrory)