- NC Policy Watch - http://www.ncpolicywatch.com -

Monday numbers from an Altered State, Part 2

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Starving the schools [1]

250 — decline, in dollars, in per-student K–12 funding in North Carolina for fiscal year 2015 from 2014 (“Most states still funding schools less than before the recession,” Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Oct. 16, 2014)

14.5 — percentage reduction in per-pupil spending in North Carolina from 2007–08 to 2014–15 when adjusted for inflation (Ibid)

7 — rank of North Carolina among 50 states in largest percentage of reduction in per-pupil spending from 2007–08 to 2014–15 (Ibid)

32 — percent reduction in funding for teacher assistants in the last seven years (“Local school districts grapple with losing valuable teacher assistants as school year approaches,” Progressive Pulse, July 15, 2015)

7,000 — fewer teachers now state-funded, compared with 2008 (Ibid)

Losing its luster [2]

25 — rank of North Carolina among the 50 states in average teacher salary in 2008–09 (ncpublicschools.org)

47 — rank of North Carolina among the 50 states in average teacher salary in 2013–14 (Ibid)

11.1 — percent rate of North Carolina teacher turnover, 2010–11 (Ibid)

14.84 — percent rate of North Carolina teacher turnover, 2014–15 (Ibid)

Paving the way toward privatization [3]

4,200 — amount in dollars of vouchers provided to low-income students to use at private or religious schools (“Taxpayer funds may be funneled to home schools through school vouchers,” N.C. Policy Watch, Dec. 12, 2013)

19,105 — tuition, in dollars, for students in grades 1–4 at Charlotte Country Day School (charlottecountryday.org)

0 — number of credentials, licenses or levels of educational attainment required of teachers at schools eligible to receive taxpayer-funded vouchers (“Taxpayer funds may be funneled to home schools through school vouchers,” N.C. Policy Watch, Dec. 12, 2013)

0 — number of schools eligible to receive taxpayer-funded vouchers that will be evaluated as part of the state’s A–F grading system designed to give more information to parents (Ibid)

UNC system at risk [4]

42.7 — percentage increase in tuition and fees at UNC system schools since 2008 (“Diminished expectations and the resulting drag on North Carolina’s economy: A summary of the fiscal year 2015–17 budget,” N.C. Budget & Tax Center, October 2015)

16 — percentage decrease in state funding per student in the UNC system since 2008 (Ibid)