Monday numbers

Monday numbers

numbers221-400
270,000—number of unemployed workers in North Carolina (“Coming up Short: Lawmakers’ Top Shortcomings for Reducing Economic Hardship in 2015, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, December 2015)

23,000—number of laid off workers in North Carolina who receive unemployment benefits (Ibid)

50—ranking of North Carolina among the 50 states in the percentage of laid off workers who receive unemployment insurance (“Forbes prints inaccurate claims about unemployment insurance changes in North Carolina, Progressive Pulse, January 15, 2016)

11.5—average length of time unemployment insurance received by laid off workers in North Carolina (Ibid)

50—ranking of North Carolina among the 50 states in the average length of time that laid off workers receive unemployment insurance (Ibid)

233.69—amount in dollars of the average weekly unemployment benefit received by laid off workers in North Carolina (Ibid)

46—ranking of North Carolina among the 50 states with the lowest average weekly unemployment benefit (Ibid)

8—-number of families in North Carolina currently receiving cash assistance for every 100 families with children in poverty (“Coming up Short: Lawmakers’ Top Shortcomings for Reducing Economic Hardship in 2015, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, December 2015)

74—number of families in North Carolina that received cash assistance for every 100 families with children in poverty in 1996 (Ibid)

50,000—number of at-risk four-year-olds in North Carolina eligible for NC PreK (Ibid)

28,400—number of slots in NC PreK currently available for at-risk four-year-olds (Ibid)

34,876—number of slots in NC PreK in 2009 (Ibid)

907,000—estimated number of low-wage workers in North Carolina that claimed the state Earned Income Tax Credit in 2012 (Ibid)

1.2 million—estimated number of children that benefited from the state EITC in 2012 (Ibid)

0—number of low-income families that were able to claim the state EITC in 2015 because the General Assembly decided to eliminate it (Ibid)

1,815—amount in dollars of the tax cut received by the wealthiest one percent of taxpayers in North Carolina in the budget passed by the General Assembly in 2015 (“Five Findings: Tax-cut plan will harm North Carolina’s Competitive Position,” Progressive Pulse, September 16, 2015)