Monday numbers

Monday numbers

XGR_mondaymap410—-number of days since a three-judge panel threw out North Carolina’s Congressional Districts 1 and 12 as racial gerrymanders (“Federal three-judge panel throws out Congressional Districts 1 and 12 as racial gerrymanders, Progressive Pulse, February 5, 2016)

4—number of days until the February 19th deadline the court gave lawmakers to draw new maps for the state’s congressional districts (Ibid)

29—number of days until the March 15th primary election (N.C. State Board of Elections)

78—number of days until traditional primary election date of May 3 that the General Assembly changed in the 2015 legislative session (Ibid)

48.7—percentage of voters in North Carolina who voted for a Republican for Congress in 2012 (“Redistricting Delivers North Carolina to Republicans,” Bloomberg News, March 19, 2013)

50.6— percentage of voters in North Carolina who voted for a Democrat for Congress in 2012 (Ibid)

4—number of Democrats elected to Congress from North Carolina in 2012 (Ibid)

9—number of Republicans elected to Congress from North Carolina in 2012 (Ibid)

3—number of Democrats elected to Congress from North Carolina in 2014 (N.C. State Board of Elections

10—number of Republicans elected to Congress from North Carolina in 2014 (Ibid)

41—number of state House districts where only one major party candidate is on the ballot in 2016 (“The Forgotten 54,” North Carolina Common Cause)

3 million—number of North Carolinians who live in districts where the race for the state House is already decided (Ibid)

13—number of state Senate districts where only one major party candidate is on the ballot in 2016 (Ibid)

2.5 million—number of North Carolinians who live in districts where the race for the state Senate is already decided (Ibid)

43—average percentage of state legislative races since 1992 that have had only one candidate on the ballot in the general election (“Majority of N.C. House members support bill to end gerrymandering,” End Gerrymandering Now, February 20, 2015)

8—percentage of legislative races that were competitive in 2014—decided by 5 percentage points or less (Ibid)

63—number of co-sponsors of House Bill 92 in the 2015-2016 General Assembly that would establish an independent redistricting process (N.C. General Assembly, House Bill 92)

0—number of committee hearings held in the 2015 legislative session on House Bill 92 that would establish an independent redistricting process (N.C. General Assembly)

88—number of votes for a similar redistricting reform bill that passed the Republican-controlled House in 2011 (N.C. General Assembly)

0—number of hearings for the 2011 redistricting reform bill in the Senate in 2011 (Ibid)

77—percentage of voters in North Carolina who believe there is a conflict of interest when legislators draw their own districts (“Poll: N.C. Voters Support Redistricting Reform, North Carolinians for Redistricting Reform, April 29, 2013)

70—percentage of voters in North Carolina who supporting turning over redistricting to nonpartisan staff, the procedure currently used in Iowa (Ibid)