Monday numbers

Monday numbers

110-hb2110—number of days since the General Assembly passed the sweeping anti-LGBT bill HB2 in a one day special session (NC General Assembly)

110—number of days since Gov. Pat McCrory signed HB2 just hours it was passed in the special session (Ibid)

81—number of days since NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said that the General Assembly must change HB2 to keep the 2017 All-Star Game in Charlotte (“NBA’s Silver: LGBT law must change to keep 2017 All-Star Game in Charlotte, Charlotte Observer, April 21, 2016)

11—number of days since the NBA announced that it did not support a rumored compromise on HB2 that ultimately was never introduced in the General Assembly (“NBA, Hornets reject current HB2 compromise bill,” Progressive Pulse, July 1, 2016)

60 million—amount in dollars of spending that the NBA All-Star Game would bring to the Charlotte area (“Chamber: Let cities pass own LGBT protections,” Charlotte Observer, May 24, 2016)

3—number of days since 68 corporations including Microsoft, Apple, Bloomberg, Capital One, General Electric, IBM, Nike, Morgan Stanley, PayPal, Dow Chemical and Red Hat filed an amicus brief supporting the lawsuit challenging HB2  (“68 companies join brief in House Bill 2 lawsuit,” News & Observer, July 8, 2016)

3—number of days since Gov. Pat McCrory criticized the 68 major corporations for signing on to amicus brief support the lawsuit challenging HB2 (Ibid)

11—number of days since the General Assembly adjourned its 2016 regular session (N.C. General Assembly)

68—number of days that the 2016 General Assembly was in regular session (Ibid)

1—number of days into the General Assembly that Rep. Darren Jackson filed House Bill 946 to repeal HB2 (Ibid)

1—number of days into the General Assembly session that Sens. Van Duyn, J. Jackson, and Woodard filed Senate Bill 784 to repeal HB2 (Ibid)

0—number of hearings held in the House during the legislative session to consider the bill to repeal HB2 (Ibid)

0—number of hearings held in the Senate during the legislative session to consider the bill to repeal HB2  (Ibid)

32—percentage of North Carolina voters who support HB2 (Public Policy Polling, June 24, 2016)

43—percentage of North Carolina voters who oppose HB2 (Ibid)

2 million—amount in dollars of lost tourism revenue in Asheville area because of HB2 (“Asheville CVB: HB2 losses rise toward $2 million, Asheville Citizen-Times April 16, 2016)

40 million—amount in dollars of convention business in Raleigh that may be lost because of HB2 (“HB2 could cost Raleigh up to $40M in convention business, WRAL-TV, July 6, 2016)

285 million—amount in dollars that the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce said in May that HB2 was costing Mecklenburg County (“Chamber: Let cities pass own LGBT protections,” Charlotte Observer, May 24, 2016)

1,300 jobs—minimum number of jobs that Charlotte Chamber of Commerce said in May that HB2 was costing Mecklenburg County (Ibid)

58—percentage decline in new inquiries about economic development in Charlotte area since Gov. McCrory signed HB2 into law. (Ibid)