Monday numbers

Monday numbers

numbers_211400 22—rank of North Carolina in 2003-2004 among the 50 states in average teacher pay (“Back to school: A competitive pay plan for North Carolina teachers, Progressive Pulse, September 7, 2016)

41—rank of North Carolina in 2015-2016 in average teacher pay (Ibid)

30—percentage decline in enrollment at UNC Schools of education and teacher preparation programs (“Not Worth It: Why NC College Students Are Turning Away From Teaching,” WUNC-FN, February 6, 2016)

65—percentage of wages of other college graduates earned by teachers in North Carolina (“Back to school: A competitive pay plan for North Carolina teachers, Progressive Pulse, September 7, 2016)

77—national average of percentage of wages of other college graduates earned by teachers (Ibid)

49—rank of North Carolina among the 50 states in wage competitiveness for teachers (Ibid)

50,000—amount in dollars of average teacher pay according to Gov. Pat McCrory (“McCrory’s campaign focusing on teacher pay,” Associated Press, September 4, 2016)

54.2 million—amount in dollars of the cost of a 1% increase in average teacher salaries (Teacher salaries: the $50,000 question,” Progressive Pulse, August 31, 2016)

205.8 million—amount in dollars for teacher salary increases in the 2016-2017 budget (Ibid)

3.8—percentage increase in average teacher salary paid for by $205.8 million in budget (Ibid)

47,931—amount in dollars of average teacher salary in FY 15-16 including local supplements (Ibid)

49,751—amount in dollars of average teacher salary with a 3.8% increase (Ibid)

24 million—amount in dollars of the hole in the budget if average teacher salaries reach $50,000 (Ibid)

6,237—amount in dollars of state General Fund per-pupil spending on public schools in 2008-2009 (“Math is hard: Civitas uses backwards math to tell false story on public schools budgets,” Progressive Pulse, June 20, 2016)

5,616—amount in dollars of state General Fund per-pupil spending on public schools in 2016-2017 adjusted for inflation (Ibid)

20—number of years since the last pre-recession year that inflation adjusted state General Fund per-pupil spending on public schools was as low as 2016-2017 (Ibid)

1.436 billion—amount in dollars of the annual state revenue lost in 2016-2017 thanks to the tax reductions since 2013 (“The Road to Nowhere Good for North Carolina :Latest Tax Changes That Aim for Zero Income Tax Continue to Benefit the Wealthy at the Expense of Working North Carolinians and Communities, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, August 2016)

15,500—amount in dollars of the average total state tax cut for the top one percent of taxpayers in North Carolina since 2013 (Ibid)