Monday numbers

Monday numbers

5—number of days since Governor Roy Cooper announced that he was pushing ahead with plans to expand Medicaid in North Carolina to create jobs, help hospitals and provide health care coverage to hundreds of thousands of people who are currently uninsured (“Gov. Roy Cooper wants to expand Medicaid; Republicans vow to fight, News & Observer, January 4, 2017)

3—number of days since Cooper’s administration filed an amendment with the federal government to the state Medicaid plan to provide for expansion (“Gov. Roy Cooper moves to expand Medicaid,” News & Observer, January 6, 2016)

31—number of states and the District of Columbia that have already expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act and provided health care coverage to millions of previously uninsured adults (“Beyond the Reduction in Uncompensated Care: Medicaid Expansion Is Having a Positive Impact on Safety Net Hospitals and Clinics,” Georgetown University Center for Children and Families and Georgetown University Health Policy Institute, June 2016)

19—number of states including North Carolina that had declined federal funding available under the Affordable Care Act to expand Medicaid to their lowest income residents (Ibid)

300,000—number of people in North Carolina that because of the decision not to expand Medicaid fall into to the coverage gap—they do not currently meet the income and/or categorical eligibility requirements to receive Medicaid and either do not have a job that provides employer sponsored health insurance or cannot afford to purchase private health insurance (“Talking points on Closing the Coverage Gap, N.C. Justice Center, August 2016)

56—percentage of people in the Medicaid coverage gap in North Carolina who are currently employed (Ibid)

67—percentage of people in the Medicaid coverage gap in North Carolina who live in a family where at least one person is working (Ibid)

53—percentage of people in the Medicaid coverage gap in North Carolina who are female (Ibid)

52—percentage of people in the Medicaid coverage gap in North Carolina who are white (Ibid)

17—percentage of people in the Medicaid coverage gap in North Carolina who are aged 55 to 64 (Ibid)

34—percentage of people in the Medicaid coverage gap in North Carolina who are aged 35 to 54 (Ibid)

72—percentage of people in North Carolina that believe the state should develop a plan to “fix the health insurance gap” (Ibid)

2 billion—amount in dollars of federal funding that would flow to North Carolina every year if Medicaid was expanded (“Factsheet: Expanding Medicaid in North Carolina, N.C. Justice Center, March 2015)

11.3 billion—amount in dollars that hospitals in North Carolina are losing in federal funding in the next five years that was intended to offset their loss of funding for Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement (“What Is the Result of States Not Expanding Medicaid?” Urban Institute and Robert Wood Foundation, August 2014)

25,000—number of new jobs that would be created by expanding Medicaid in North Carolina (Medicaid Expansion Option Issue Brief, N.C. Institute of Medicine, 2013)

62—percentage of Independent and Republican voters in North Carolina who support closing the coverage gap (Ibid)