Monday numbers

Monday numbers

- in Fitzsimon File

42—number of years since the creation of a federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) to help low-wage workers (Prosperity Watch (Issue 69, No. 4: The Earned Income Tax Credit delivers a bottom-up tax cut to working families in every county,” N.C. Budget & Tax Center, January 30, 2017)

22—percentage of North Carolina filing tax returns that claimed a federal EITC in 2014, the latest year for which data is available (Ibid)

14—number of counties in North Carolina that had at least one-third of taxpayers claiming the federal credit (Ibid)

43—number of counties in North Carolina that had at least one-fourth of taxpayers claiming the federal credit (Ibid)

10—number of years since North Carolina created a state EITC to help low-wage workers (“NC Says Good-Bye To Earned Income Tax Credit, Only State To Do So In 30 Years,” WUNC, March 15, 2014)

3—number of years since North Carolina allowed its state EITC to end in 2013 (“States Can Adopt or Expand Earned Income Tax Credits to Build a Stronger Future Economy,” Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, January 19, 2016)

0—number of other states with a state EITC that have allowed it to expire in the last 30 years (“BTC BRIEF: First in Flight from the EITC – Low-Income Working Families Bid Farewell to NC’s Earned Income Tax Credit, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, March 2014)

15,500—amount in dollars of the average total state tax cut for the top one percent of taxpayers in North Carolina since 2013 (“The Road to Nowhere Good for North Carolina :Latest Tax Changes That Aim for Zero Income Tax Continue to Benefit the Wealthy at the Expense of Working North Carolinians and Communities, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, August 2016)

1,000,000—amount in dollars of the average annual income of the top one percent of taxpayers in North Carolina (Ibid)

10—amount in dollars of the total state tax INCREASE for the bottom 20 percent of taxpayers since 2013 (Ibid)

12,000—amount in dollars of the average annual income of the bottom 20 percent of taxpayers in North Carolina (Ibid)

907,000—estimated number of low-wage workers in North Carolina that had claimed the state EITC (“BTC BRIEF: First in Flight from the EITC – Low-Income Working Families Bid Farewell to NC’s Earned Income Tax Credit, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, March 2014)

1.2 million—estimated number of children in families that benefited from the state EITC each year (Ibid)

119—amount in dollars of the average credit received by state EITC recipients in 2012 (Ibid)

64,000—number of military families that benefited from the state EITC in 2011 (“64,000 North Carolina Military Families Set to Lose EITC, Experience Tax Increase, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, July 2013)

27—number of states and the District of Columbia that currently have their own state version of the federal Earned Income Tax Credit that helps low-wage workers (“States Can Adopt or Expand Earned Income Tax Credits to Build a Stronger Future Economy,” Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, January 19, 2016)

4—number of states that have enacted state EITCs since 2013 (Ibid)

12—number of states and the District of Columbia that expanded their EITC since 2013 to help more low-income families (Ibid)

30—number of years since President Ronald Reagan called the EITC “the best anti-poverty, the best pro-family, the best job creation measure to come out of Congress” (“Earned Income Tax Credit,” Center on Budget and Policy Priorities)