Monday numbers

Monday numbers

Photo from flickr user familymwr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/familymwr/6277787834/), (CC BY 2.0, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)
Photo from flickr user familymwr, (CC BY 2.0)

1,112—number of students for every school nurse in North Carolina (2017 North Carolina Child Health Report Card, N.C. Child and N.C. Institute of Medicine)

750—number of recommended students per school nurse ratio to adequately meet the health needs of students (Ibid)

52.6–percentage of children ages 0-5 who live in home with household income below 200 percent of the federal poverty level (2017 North Carolina Child Health Report Card, N.C. Child and N.C. Institute of Medicine)

22—percentage of children who live in food insecure households (Ibid)

95.6—percentage of children with health care coverage in North Carolina (Ibid)

6.1—percentage of low-income children without health care coverage in North Carolina in 2015 (Ibid)

10.6— percentage of low-income children without health care coverage in North Carolina in 2011 (Ibid)

15.3—percentage of parents without health care coverage in 2015 (Ibid)

20.6—percentage of parents without health care coverage in 2011 (Ibid)

80.6—percentage of women aged 18-44 with health insurance coverage in 2015 (Ibid)

73.6—percentage of women aged 18-44 with health insurance coverage in 2011 (Ibid)

67.8—percentage of pregnant women who received early prenatal care in 2015 (Ibid)

71.2—percentage of pregnant women who received early prenatal care in 2011 (Ibid)

382—percentage increase in cost of health care premiums in North Carolina under the Republican health care proposal for a 45 year old with an income of $22,000 (“House Tax Credits Would Make Health Insurance Far Less Affordable in High-Cost States, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, March 9, 2017)

2—rank of North Carolina among the 50 states with the largest increase in the cost of health care premiums under the Republican heath care proposal for 45 year old with an income of $22,000 (Ibid)