Monday numbers

Monday numbers

22.9 billion—amount in dollars spent in the 2017-2018 fiscal year by the budget passed by the Senate last week (“N.C. Senate Would Have State Stand Still in Face of Uncertainty, Growing Needs,” N.C. Budget & Tax Center, May 2015)

2.5—percentage increase in spending in Senate budget over current fiscal year (Ibid)

3.8—percentage increase in medical care in the last year (Ibid)

6—average percent of state investments as a share of the economy over the last 45 years (Ibid)

5—percent of state economy represented by the Senate budget for the 2017-2018 fiscal year (Ibid)

4.9—percent of state economy represented by the Senate budget for the 2018-2019 fiscal year (Ibid)

3 billion—amount in dollars of the annual cost to the state treasury of tax changes made by the General Assembly since 2013 (Ibid)

24.2—percent decline in state funding for Natural and Economic Resources since Fiscal Year 2007-08, adjusted for inflation (Ibid)

21.3—percent decline in state funding for general government operations since Fiscal Year 2007-08, adjusted for inflation (Ibid)

0.4—percent increase in state funding for Health and Human Services since Fiscal Year 2007-08, adjusted for inflation (Ibid)

2.4—percent increase in state funding for Education since Fiscal Year 2007-08, adjusted for inflation (Ibid)

15.3—percent increase in state funding for Justice and Public Safety since Fiscal Year 2007-08, adjusted for inflation (Ibid)

22,000—number of low-income working North Carolinians who could lose access to food assistance under the Senate budget (The Senate budget poses a very real threat to helping people in need,” Progressive Pulse, May 12, 2017)

324 million—amount in dollars of the cost next year of the tax cut in the budget passed by the Senate last week (“Changes to child tax credit in Senate budget hurt middle class taxpayers,” Progressive Pulse, May 12, 2017)

800 million—amount in dollars of the minimum annual cost of the tax cut within five years (Ibid)

40,000—number of children in North Carolina eligible for NC PreK but not receiving services. (“What NC could do with the $3 billion our lawmakers gave to the wealthy,” Progressive Pulse, May 12, 2017)

191 million—amount in dollars of the cost of placing all those children in NC PreK (Ibid)

77 million—amount in dollars less that Senate budget funds textbooks in K-12 schools below funding level in 2010 (“Senate’s budget continues to underinvest in public education,” Progressive Pulse, May 10, 2017)

About the author

Chris Fitzsimon, Founder and Executive Director of N.C. Policy Watch, writes the Fitzsimon File, delivers a radio commentary broadcast on WRAL-FM and hosts "News and Views," a weekly radio news magazine that airs on multiple stations across North Carolina.
chris@ncpolicywatch.com
919-861-2066