Monday numbers

Monday numbers

2,466—amount in dollars that per-student state funding in the UNC system is less than the funding level in 2008 when adjusted for inflation (“Funding Down, Tuition Up: State Cuts to Higher Education Threaten Quality and Affordability at Public Colleges, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, August 15, 2016)

20—percentage decline in per-pupil funding for the university system from 2008 to 2016 when adjusted for inflation (“State-by-State Fact Sheets: Higher Education Cuts Jeopardize Students’ and States’ Economic Future, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, August 18, 2016)

2,051—amount in dollars of average tuition increase for campuses in the UNC system since 2008 (Ibid)

27—percentage of in-state university funding that came from student tuition in 2008-2009 (“NC’s disinvestment: More tuition, more debt, fewer teachers,” Higher Education Works)

38—percentage of in-state university funding that currently comes from student tuition (Ibid)

378 million—amount in dollars more than North Carolina students and their families collectively pay for a public university education now than they did in 2008-09 (Ibid)

15,263—amount in dollars of the average debt level of graduating seniors in the UNC system in 2006-2007 (Ibid)

24,358—amount in dollars of the average debt level of graduating seniors in the UNC system in 2013-2014 (Ibid)

660 million—amount in dollars of “management flexibility” cuts made to the university budget since 2010 (“New Budget, Same Missed Opportunities for North Carolina,” N.C. Budget & Tax Center, July 2017)

7 million—amount in dollars of the flexibility cut to the university system in the second year of the two-year budget passed by the General Assembly this summer (Ibid)

16—number of days since UNC President Margaret Spellings praised the state budget passed this year as the best budget in a decade (“UNC president: State funding at best in a decade,” Charlotte Observer, July 22, 2017)

499 million—amount in dollars that is left unappropriated in the final budget after money is deposited in the state’s savings account (N.C. General Assembly, Senate Bill 237)

528 million—amount in dollars of the cost of the tax cuts enacted in the two-year budget passed by the General Assembly this year (“New Budget, Same Missed Opportunities for North Carolina,” N.C. Budget & Tax Center, July 2017)

900 million—amount in dollars of the full cost of the tax cuts passed by the General Assembly this year when fully in place (Ibid)

3.5 billion—amount in dollars of lost revenue thanks to the combined tax changes made by the General Assembly since 2013 (Ibid)

22,000—amount in dollars of the total tax cut received since 2013 by the people in the top one percent of income earners in North Carolina, people who earn more than $492,000 a year (Ibid)

About the author

Chris Fitzsimon, Founder and Executive Director of N.C. Policy Watch, writes the Fitzsimon File, delivers a radio commentary broadcast on WRAL-FM and hosts "News and Views," a weekly radio news magazine that airs on multiple stations across North Carolina.
chris@ncpolicywatch.com
919-861-2066