Monday redistricting numbers

Monday redistricting numbers

83—number of days since the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously agreed with a lower court ruling that General Assembly districts drawn in 2011 were illegally gerrymandered based on race (“U.S. Supreme Court agrees NC legislative districts were illegally gerrymandered based on race,” Progressive Pulse, June 6, 2017)

19—number of state House seats the federal courts ruled were unconstitutional because of racial gerrymandering (“NC lawmakers debate redistricting maps. Some votes taken, more to come,” News & Observer, August 25, 2017)

9—number of state Senate seats the federal courts ruled were unconstitutional because of racial gerrymandering (Ibid)

6—number of days since the overwhelming majority of speakers at public hearings on redistricting held across the state urged lawmakers to adopt fair bipartisan maps that are not gerrymandered to favor one political party (“North Carolina voters give lawmakers tongue-lashing over new proposed legislative maps,” N.C. Policy Watch, August 22, 2017)

33—number of districts in the new state Senate maps that President Trump would have won in 2016 (“NC lawmakers debate redistricting maps. Some votes taken, more to come,” News & Observer, August 25, 2017)

76—number of districts in the new state House maps that President Trump would have won in 2016 (Ibid)

49.9—percentage of the statewide vote received by President Trump in 2016 (Ibid)

46.1—percentage of the statewide vote received by Hillary Clinton in 2016 (Ibid)

49.02—percentage of the statewide vote received by Governor Roy Cooper in 2016 (N.C. State Board of Elections)

48.80—percentage of the statewide vote received by Pat McCrory in 2016 (Ibid)

182—number of days since House Bill 200 that would establish a nonpartisan redistricting process was introduced in the North Carolina House (N.C. General Assembly, House Bill 200)

39—number of co-sponsors of House Bill 200 that would establish a nonpartisan redistricting process (Ibid)

4—number of primary sponsors of House Bill 200 that would establish a nonpartisan redistricting process (Ibid)

4—number of primary sponsors of House Bill 200 who are Republicans (Ibid)

60—number of days since the 2017 General Assembly adjourned its long session earlier this summer (Ibid)

123—number of days that the General Assembly was in session after HB200 that would establish a nonpartisan redistricting process was introduced before it adjourned (Ibid)

0—number of committee hearings held to discuss House Bill 200 (Ibid)

4—number of days since Senate Redistricting Chair Ralph Hise said that he didn’t believe in “unicorns, fairies or the mythical nonpartisan commission.” (NC Insider State Government News Service, August 24, 2017)

5—number of times that Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger sponsored bills to establish an independent redistricting commission before 2011 when Republicans were in the minority in the General Assembly (“Redistricting bills face Senate resistance, Charlotte Observer, February 3, 2015)