Monday numbers

Monday numbers

165—number of public schools that received a grade of A or A+ng on the A-F grading system for the 2016-2017 school year (2016–17 Performance and Growth of North Carolina Public Schools, N.C. Department of Public Instruction, September 7, 2017)

7.1—percentage of public schools that received a grade of A or A+ng on the A-F grading system for the 2016-2017 school year (Ibid)

85—number of public schools that received a grade of F on the A-F grading system for the 2016-2017 school year (Ibid)

435—number of public schools that received a grade of D on the A-F grading system for the 2016-2017 school year (Ibid)

22.5—percentage of public schools that received a grade of D or F on the A-F grading system for the 2016-2017 school year (Ibid)

13.4—percentage of schools that received a grade of A or A+ng on the A-F grading system for the 2016-2017 school year with less than 50 percent of students who qualify for free or reduced lunch (Ibid)

98 —percentage of schools that received a grade of F on the A-F grading system for the 2016-2017 school year with more than 50 percent of students who qualify for free or reduced lunch (Ibid)

91.8—percentage of schools that received a grade of D on the A-F grading system for the 2016-2017 school year with more than 50 percent of students who qualify for free or reduced lunch (Ibid)

92.8—percentage of schools that received a grade of D or F on the A-F grading system for the 2016-2017 school year with more than 50 percent of students who qualify for free or reduced lunch (Ibid)

80—percentage of letter grade for a school that is determined by the performance of students on a standardized test (“Quick Facts: A-F School Performance Grades, Public Schools First NC)

20—percentage of letter grade for a school that is determined by growth in test scores, making it difficult for high poverty schools to receive higher grades regardless of how much students improve (Ibid)

182—number of days since Michigan’s Republican Superintendent of Schools announced he was dropping plans for an A-F school report card system because “it just increases the high-stakes nature of the one exam…and it does more harm than good” (AP NewsBreak: State Drops Planned A-F Grades for Schools, Associated Press, March 13, 2017)

2—number of years since Virginia abolished the A-F grading system for public schools because it was ineffective and primarily reflected which schools had a higher percentage of low-income students (“North Carolina’s step-by-step war on public education, Washington Post, August 7, 2015)

About the author

Chris Fitzsimon, Founder and Executive Director of N.C. Policy Watch, writes the Fitzsimon File, delivers a radio commentary broadcast on WRAL-FM and hosts "News and Views," a weekly radio news magazine that airs on multiple stations across North Carolina.
chris@ncpolicywatch.com
919-861-2066