Monday numbers – A closer look at what teachers think about about guns

Monday numbers – A closer look at what teachers think about about guns

- in Education, Top Story

Last month, in response to the latest in a series of mass shootings in American schools, some lawmakers suggested arming North Carolina teachers. Last week, pollsters at Elon University released the results of a poll in which they asked North Carolina teachers about the issue.

Today, we present some numbers from that poll and gun-related numbers from the 2016 Uniform Crime Reporting Data report of the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation.

78 percent – The number of teachers in the Elon poll who said it was a bad idea to allow teachers to carry guns in schools.

74 percent – The number of teachers in the Elon poll who said they would not carry a gun in school if allowed.

61 percent – The number of teachers in the Elon poll who said allowing teachers to carry guns in school would make them feel less safe.

68 percent – The number of teachers in the Elon poll who said guns carried by teachers in school would be likely to fall into the wrong hands.

69 percent
– The number of teachers in the Elon poll who said arming teachers would be a bad idea even if the number of teachers was limited and they underwent training.

99 percent – The number of teachers in the Elon poll who said they would favor ensuring background checks on all gun sales.

77 percent – The number of teachers in the Elon poll who said they would favor banning sales of  sales of semi-automatic high capacity rifles.

92 percent – The number of teacher in the Elon poll who said they would favor increased support for mental health funding.

298 – The number of known murders committed with handguns in North Carolina in 2016, as recorded by the SBI.

13 percent – The increase in that number between 2015 and 2016.

128 – The number of known murders committed using unspecified or undetermined types of firearms in North Carolina in 2016, as recorded by the SBI.

47 percent – The increase in that number between 2015 and 2016.

10,827 – The number of aggravated assaults committed with a firearm in North Carolina in 2016, as recorded by the SBI in 2016.

12 percent – The increase in that number between 2015 and 2016.

About the author

Joe Killian, Investigative Reporter, joined N.C. Policy Watch in August of 2016. His work takes a closer look at government, politics and policy in North Carolina and their impact on the lives of everyday people. Before joining Policy Watch, Joe spent a decade at the News & Record in Greensboro, reporting on everything from cops and courts to higher education. He covered the city councils of High Point and Greensboro and the Guilford County Board of Commissioners before becoming the paper’s full-time government and politics reporter. His work has also appeared in the Winston-Salem Journal, Go Triad, the Bristol Press in Bristol, Conn., and the Cape Cod Times in Hyannis, Mass.
joe@ncpolicywatch.com
919-863-2402