Monday numbers – A closer look at the well-being of North Carolina’s children

Monday numbers – A closer look at the well-being of North Carolina’s children

- in Must Reads, News, Top Story

The following collection of numbers comes from the 2018 North Carolina Child Health Report Card compiled by researchers at NC Child and the NC Institute of Medicine. Click here to view the entire 12-page report

46 – percentage of North Carolina children who live in poor or low-income homes (<200% Federal Poverty Level)

49.2 – percentage of North Carolina children ages 0-5 who live in poor or low-income homes (<200% FPL)

28 – percentage of North Carolina children living in households spending over 30% of income on housing costs. Higher housing costs can lead to difficulties accessing health insurance coverage and healthy foods, both of which can impact children’s health outcomes

22.6 – percentage of North Carolina children who live in food-insecure households

23.3 – percentage of North Carolina children who meet recommended guidelines for physical activity. Meeting the recommended guidelines for physical activity reduces risk of obesity, diabetes, and depression, and promotes lifelong health.

30.9 – percentage of North Carolina children ages 10-17 who are overweight or obese

13 – percentage of North Carolina high school students who currently smoke cigarettes

29.6 – percentage of North Carolina high school students who currently use electronic vapor products

29.2 – percentage of North Carolina high school students who currently use alcohol (including beer)

17.9 – percentage of North Carolina high school students who have ever used prescription drugs without a doctor’s prescription

9.3 – percentage of North Carolina high school students who attempted suicide in the past year

12.3 – percentage of North Carolina adolescents (age 12-17) who have had a major depressive episode in the past year

1072 – There is currently one school nurse for every 1,072 children in North Carolina public schools. School nurses are a particularly vital resource for students living in poverty, who often face barriers to traditional health care access and who may have no other support to manage chronic conditions or receive preventive care.