Monday numbers: A closer look at child well-being

Monday numbers: A closer look at child well-being

- in Other Voices, Top Story

The following figures come from the recently released 2018 KIDS COUNT Data Book by The Annie E. Casey Foundation. View the complete report here.

$24,339 – The official poverty level in 2016 for a family of two adults and two children

19 – percentage of children (14.1 million) nationwide who lived in families with incomes below the poverty line in 2016 (latest year for which the data is available)

22 – percentage of North Carolina children living in poverty

294,000 – number of low-income working families with children in North Carolina

4% – unemployment rate of North Carolina parents in 2017

5% – number of North Carolina children with at least one unemployed parent

29 – percentage of North Carolina children whose parents lack secure employment

82,000 – number of female-headed families in North Carolina receiving child support

32 – percentage of children nationwide living in households with a high housing cost burden (*Families who spend more than 30 percent of their income on housing, have less money for other necessities such as food, health care, transportation and child care.)

12 – percent of white students who did not graduate from high school on time.

24 – percent of African American students who did not graduate from high school on time

– percent of North Carolina teens ages 16 to 19 not attending school and not working

1 million – the number of children under the age of five who failed to be counted in the 2010 U.S. Census

73,000 – the number of children under the age of five in North Carolina living in hard-to-count census tracts between 2012-2016

2020 – when the next U.S Census will take place. (The 2020 Census will determine how much federal funding states and localities receive each year for the next decade. An accurate count of children will impact everything from funding for school lunches, to health care to housing assistance.)