Tuesday numbers: The state of working North Carolina

Tuesday numbers: The state of working North Carolina

The following numbers are from the N.C. Budget and Tax Center’s new and special “State of Working North Carolina” report, “Crucial Connections How public works can boost: North Carolina’s work force and connect rural N.C.”

***On infrastructure spending:

Several decades – Time period during which federal public infrastructure spending on essentials that create jobs like transportation, water systems, and schools has steadily declined (today’s investments are actually below 1979 levels)

$344 billion – Total amount of state and local government public infrastructure spending in April, 2009

$282 billion – Total in April, 2018

A full half percentage point – Amount North Carolina’s public infrastructure spending declined between 2002 and 2014, despite a rapidly growing population.

$3.5 billion – Amount of additional funds that North Carolina state government would have available to spend in FY 2019 if it had merely kept the tax code that existed in 2013 in place

***On the gap between rural and urban areas:

320,000 – Number of goods producing jobs that North Carolina lost between 2000 and 2017 (100,000 in rural communities and 220,000 in urban communities).

Only around 1% – Difference in extreme poverty rates between North Carolina metro and non-metro areas

More than one-third – Share of NC metro area residents with incomes of 400% of the poverty level or more

Less than one-fourth – Share of non-metro area residents with incomes of 400% of the poverty level or more

$1,400 – Amount less that non-metro workers with a high school diploma make annually than metro area workers with similar education

$7,800 – Annual median income gap between non-metro and metro workers with bachelor’s degrees

$16,000+ – Gap for workers with advanced degrees

$460,000 – Average annual income for wealthiest 1% of non-metro area residents in N.C.

$1.2 million – Average annual income for wealthiest 1% in metro areas

***On the need to be connected to the broader world and global economy:

0.5% – reduction in unemployment, 1% decline in poverty and $1,390 increase in median wage – changes seen for every 5% that a county’s foreign-born population rises

0.1% – reduction in unemployment, almost a 1% lower poverty rate, and a $1,300 increase in median income – Changes seen for every 5% increase that a county enjoys in the number of households with access to broadband internet service

0.4% – reduction in unemployment, a nearly 2% lower poverty rate, and a $2,400 increase in county median wage – changes seen for every 1% increase in the share of residents with access to a vehicle (this, since residents can commute to more affluent areas to work)

***On the importance of anchor institutions like universities, community colleges, hospitals, public libraries and public schools in supporting jobs, wealth creation and broader community well-being:

5% lower – Employment rate in rural communities with no anchor institutions vs. rural communities with anchor institutions

84% less – Likelihood that that rural hospitals will close in states that have expanded Medicaid

5 – Number rural hospitals that have closed in N.C. since 2013

$16.71 – Estimated median hourly wage in N.C. for all occupations

$20.83 – Estimated median hourly wage in N.C. for education, training and library occupations

$28.40 – Estimated median hourly wage in N.C. for healthcare practitioners and technical occupations

500,000 – Estimated number of North Carolinians who would gain health insurance if the state expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act like 30+ other states have already done