Monday numbers: A closer look at murder and extremism in the U.S.

Monday numbers: A closer look at murder and extremism in the U.S.

The Anti-Defamation League’s Center on Extremism has released its annual report on Murder and Extremism in the United States.

The 2018 numbers show a sharp increase in murders by domestic extremists, especially right-wing groups. The ADL’s interactive Hate, Extremism, Antisemitism and Terror (HEAT) Map can be used to see reported incidents in specific geographic areas all over the U.S.

This week we take a by-the-numbers look at this year’s report.

50 – the number of people known to have been killed by domestic extremists in the U.S. in 2018. That’s up over 37 in 2017 and makes 2018 the fourth-deadliest year on record for domestic extremist-related killings since 1970. It is, however, still lower than the totals for or 2015 (70) and 2016 (72)

18 – the number anti-Semitic incidents in North Carolina last year, as tracked by the Center on Extremism

38 – the instances of white supremacist propaganda in North Carolina, as tracked by the group

5 – the number of shooting sprees linked to extremists in 2018, a major factor in the surge of deaths in the new report.

38 – the number of people killed in those shooting sprees

33 – the number of people injured in the shooting sprees

17 – the number of people killed in the shooting spree at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida on February 1, 2018. It was the deadliest mass shooting at a high school in U.S. history, surpassing the 1999 massacre at Columbine High School in which 13 people were killed

11 – the number of people killed in the mass shooting at Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania — before the murders the sole suspect had posted anti-Semitic and anti-immigrant comments on the social networking site Gab, which is popular with white supremacist and alt-right groups

42 – the number of the 50 recorded 2018 deaths caused by guns — they were the weapon of choice for extremist killings this year, followed by bladed or edged weapons

98 percent – the percentage of 2018’s extremist killings attributable to right-wing extremist groups — that is higher than in 2016 (21 percent) or 2017 (62 percent); last year’s percentage is higher than any year since 1995, when the bombing at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City killed 168 people

78 percent – the percentage of 2018’s extremist killings linked to white supremacists

16 percent – the percentage of 2018’s extremist killings linked to anti-government extremists

4 percent – the percentage of 2018’s extremist killings linked to the misogynist “involuntary celibate” or “Incel” movement

2 percent – the percentage of 2018’s extremist killings linked to domestic Islamist extremism

51 percent – the number of recorded domestic extremist-related murders, in the last ten years which have had a primary or secondary ideological motivation