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Monday numbers: A closer look at murder and extremism in the U.S.

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The Anti-Defamation League’s Center on Extremism has released its annual report on Murder and Extremism in the United States [2].

The 2018 numbers show a sharp increase in murders by domestic extremists, especially right-wing groups. The ADL’s interactive Hate, Extremism, Antisemitism and Terror (HEAT) Map [3] can be used to see reported incidents in specific geographic areas all over the U.S.

This week we take a by-the-numbers look at this year’s report.

50 – the number of people known to have been killed by domestic extremists in the U.S. in 2018. That’s up over 37 in 2017 and makes 2018 the fourth-deadliest year on record for domestic extremist-related killings since 1970. It is, however, still lower than the totals for or 2015 (70) and 2016 (72)

18 – the number anti-Semitic incidents in North Carolina last year, as tracked by the Center on Extremism

38 – the instances of white supremacist propaganda in North Carolina, as tracked by the group

5 – the number of shooting sprees linked to extremists in 2018, a major factor in the surge of deaths in the new report.

38 – the number of people killed in those shooting sprees

33 – the number of people injured in the shooting sprees

17 – the number of people killed in the shooting spree at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida on February 1, 2018. It was the deadliest mass shooting at a high school in U.S. history, surpassing the 1999 massacre at Columbine High School in which 13 people were killed

11 – the number of people killed in the mass shooting at Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania — before the murders the sole suspect had posted anti-Semitic and anti-immigrant comments on the social networking site Gab, which is popular with white supremacist and alt-right groups

42 – the number of the 50 recorded 2018 deaths caused by guns — they were the weapon of choice for extremist killings this year, followed by bladed or edged weapons

98 percent – the percentage of 2018’s extremist killings attributable to right-wing extremist groups — that is higher than in 2016 (21 percent) or 2017 (62 percent); last year’s percentage is higher than any year since 1995, when the bombing at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City killed 168 people

78 percent – the percentage of 2018’s extremist killings linked to white supremacists

16 percent – the percentage of 2018’s extremist killings linked to anti-government extremists

4 percent – the percentage of 2018’s extremist killings linked to the misogynist “involuntary celibate” or “Incel” movement

2 percent – the percentage of 2018’s extremist killings linked to domestic Islamist extremism

51 percent – the number of recorded domestic extremist-related murders, in the last ten years which have had a primary or secondary ideological motivation

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