Monday numbers: A closer look at the real world challenges confronting transgender North Carolinians

Monday numbers: A closer look at the real world challenges confronting transgender North Carolinians

In 2016 the battle over HB2 cast an international spotlight on the struggles of transgender people in North Carolina.

Despite the law’s partial repeal and replacement with HB421 – which critics continue to challenge as “HB2.0” – transgender people in the state continue to face hardships and discrimination. The recent cases of a transgender woman being held in a men’s prison and transgender state employees and dependents filing a federal lawsuit over their exemption from the state health care plan have kept their difficulties in the public eye.

This week, a by-the-numbers look at the challenges and threats that transgender Americans and transgender North Carolinians  continue to face.

26 – the number of transgender people confirmed to have been murdered last year. That number is likely low – the result of both under-reporting and the frequent misgendering of transgender people killed violently (Source: Violence tracking by the Human Rights Campaign)

25 – the number of those confirmed deaths that were transgender women (ibid.)

25 – the number of those confirmed deaths that were people of color (ibid.)

8 – the number of states now offering a gender non-binary option on state issued IDs and driver’s licenses. The states are: Arkansas, California, Colorado, Indiana, Maine, Minnesota, Oregon and Utah. Vermont has announced plans for a third gender option to be introduced this summer. Though the North Carolina DMV recently streamlined the process for changing the gender marker on its state issued licenses and ID cards, there is still no option for non-binary people (Source: National Center for Transgender Equality)

21 – the national percentage of transgender people who have been able to update all of their ID and records with their new gender (Source: National Transgender Survey)

33 – the national percentage of transgender people who have been able to update none of their ID or records (ibid.)

77 – the percentage of transgender North Carolinians who reported none of their IDs had the name and gender they preferred (ibid.)

26 – the percentage of transgender North Carolinians who reported they have shown an ID with a name or gender that did not match their gender presentation and were verbally harassed, denied benefits or service, asked to leave, or assaulted (ibid.)

32 – the percentage of transgender North Carolinians in the survey who held or applied for a job during that year and reported being fired, being denied a promotion, or not being hired for a job they applied for because of their gender identity or expression (ibid.)

29 – the percentage of transgender North Carolinians in the survey who reported that they lived at or beneath the U.S. poverty line. Nationally, that number was 12 percent (ibid.)

75 – the percentage of North Carolinians in the survey who were out or perceived as transgender at some point between Kindergarten and Grade 12 (K–12) and experienced some form of mistreatment, such as being verbally harassed, prohibited from dressing according to their gender identity, disciplined more harshly, or physically or sexually assaulted because people thought they were transgender (ibid.)

21 – the percentage of transgender North Carolinians who reported they had experienced a problem in the past year with their insurance related to being transgender (the problems included being denied coverage for care related to gender transition or being denied coverage for routine care because they were transgender) (ibid.)

29 – the percentage of transgender North Carolinians who reported they saw a health care provider in the past year and had at least one negative experience related to being transgender (the experiences included being refused treatment, verbally harassed, or physically or sexually assaulted, or having to teach the provider about transgender people in order to get appropriate care) (ibid.)

26 – the percentage of transgender North Carolinians who reported they did not see a doctor when they needed to because of fear of being mistreated as a transgender person (ibid.)

42 – the percentage of transgender North Carolinians who reported they did not see a doctor when needed because they could not afford it (ibid.)