Monday numbers: A look at Census data

Monday numbers: A look at Census data

The U.S. Supreme Court last week at least temporarily blocked the Trump Administration from asking a citizenship question on 2020 Census. Challengers to the question say it has driven fear into the immigrant community and could result in inaccurate data, which would mean less federal dollars in some areas.

Below is a snapshot of some important Census numbers:

Over $800 billion — the federal funds allocated to programs that rely on Census-derived statistics

300 — the estimated number of federal programs that rely on Census-derived statistics

1950 — the last time there was a broad citizenship question on a Census

10 years — how often there is a nationwide Census count

9,535,483 — North Carolina’s population per the April 1, 2010 Census

10,383,620 — North Carolina’s current estimated population

9.6% — of the estimated current population is reportedly Hispanic or Latino

22.2% — of the estimated current population is reportedly Black or African-American

70.6% — of the estimated current population is reportedly white

3.2% — of the estimated current population is reportedly Asian

1.6% — of the estimated current population is reportedly American Indian or Alaska native

0.1% — of the estimated current population is reportedly native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander

$16.29 billion — North Carolina’s annual federal funding from Census-guided programs

$10.624 billion — the annual federal funding that goes toward North Carolina’s health programs

$964 million — the annual federal funding that goes toward North Carolina’s transportation programs

$956 million — the annual federal funding that goes toward North Carolina’s education programs

$3.244 billion — the annual federal funding that goes toward North Carolina’s human services programs

$508 million — the annual federal funding that goes toward North Carolina’s housing programs

74% — North Carolina’s 2010 return rate for 2010 Census mail participation

$16,000 — how much is forfeited for a single missed person in a Census count over a 10-year period

1 — North Carolina is projected to gain an additional seat in Congress if there is an accurate 2020 Census count

Sources: The Census Bureau, NC Counts Coalition