Monday numbers: A closer look at how NC is responding to the 2020 census

Monday numbers: A closer look at how NC is responding to the 2020 census

While COVID-19 has cancelled a lot of things this year, it hasn’t cancelled the 2020 Census.

The problem, however, is that more than four out of ten North Carolina households have yet to fill out their forms. They are not being counted.

Starting this week, the Census Bureau will be sending out trained enumerators to collect that data door-to-door as part of their “non-response follow-up” (NRFU) plan.

This week’s Monday numbers column takes a closer look at what’s at stake and how individual counties are doing with data provided by Carolina Demography. (You can visit their North Carolina 2020 Census Tracker here.)

4 million – the approximate number of North Carolinians who still need to respond to the census — otherwise North Carolina risks losing out on an estimated $7.4 billion in funding each year

59.2 – the percentage of all North Carolina households that have responded to the 2020 Census

64.8 – the percentage of North Carolina households that responded to the 2010 Census

66.5% – the national self-response rate for the 2010 census

68.2 – the percentage of households in Wake County that have responded to the 2020 Census between March 12 and August 2

62.2 – the percentage of households in Mecklenburg County have self-responded to the 2020 Census

59 – the percentage of households in Buncombe County have self-responded to the 2020 Census

57.4 – the percentage of households in Durham County that have responded to the 2020 Census, ranking the county 43rd out of North Carolina’s 100 counties in terms of its self-response rate

1 – Union County has the distinction of having the best self-response rate in North Carolina at 70.5%

100 – Avery County is on the opposite end of the spectrum, ranking last with a self-response rate of 29.3%

300 – There are nearly 300 federal programs that provide support to families, based on the data that comes from the U.S. census.

44 – North Carolina received $44 billion in federal dollars from census-derived programs in fiscal year 2017

Negative-3 – A three percent undercount of North Carolina’s children could represent a loss of $330 million over the next ten years

14 – With an accurate 2020 Census count, North Carolina could pick up one more seat in the House of Representatives, increasing its representation from 13 to 14 representatives

3 – You have three options for responding to the census – either online, by phone or by mail

46.3 – the percentage of NC households who have responded to the 2020 census by going online

52 – the number of days between now and September 30th, when all census offices are expected to complete their work

10 – approximately how many minutes it takes to complete your census questionnaire

Are you among the procrastinators? Visit my2020census.gov  to begin.

Want to see how other state are responding? Click here.