Monday numbers

Monday numbers

41numbers22—rank of North Carolina among the 50 states in average teacher pay in 2003-2004 (“How to Build an Economy that Works for All: Attract—and Keep—High-Quality Teachers in the Classroom with Competitive Pay,” N.C. Justice Center, October 2016)

41—rank of North Carolina among the 50 states in average teacher pay in 2015-2016 (Ibid)

27—rank of the U.S. among 32 countries analyzed by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in terms of competitiveness of teacher salary—how teacher salaries compare to the salaries of similarly educated workers in each country (Ibid)

100—percentage of teachers in top performing countries like Singapore, Finland, and South Korea that are recruited from the “top third” of the academic cohort (Ibid)

23—percentage of U.S. teachers that come from the top one-third of students (Ibid)

14—percentage of U.S. teachers in high poverty schools that come from the top one-third of students (Ibid)

15—percentage of possible increase in future earnings by increasing student achievement one standard deviation above average (Ibid)

1—percentage increase in the GDP that would result if the bottom 5 to 8 percent of teachers were replaced with average teachers (Ibid)

57—percentage of wages of other college graduates earned by teachers in North Carolina (Ibid)

64—national average of percentage of wages of other college graduates earned by teachers (Ibid)

49—rank of North Carolina in wage competitiveness of teacher salaries (Ibid)

81—percentage of wages of workers in comparable professions earned by teachers in Finland (Ibid)

25—increase in teacher pay in North Carolina needed to bring salaries to 80 percent of wages of other college graduates (Ibid)

1.3 billon—amount in dollars of the cost of raising teacher pay in North Carolina to 80 percent of the wages of other college graduates (Ibid)

1.4 billion—amount in dollars of the cost this year of the tax cuts passed by the General Assembly and signed by Gov. Pat McCrory since 2013 (“North Carolina’s FY2017 Budget: What it means for children in North Carolina,” N.C. Budget & Tax Center, September 2016)